NASA to Plan for All Women Space Walk

NASA is set to have its first All-Woman spacewalk on Friday. Despite it being the agency’s 221st spacewalk, this Friday will see it being handled entirely by women for the first time. Among those appointed to run the program are astronauts Jessica Meir and Christina Koch, with it being Meir’s first spacewalk.

All through the age of space travel, women have not gotten the chance to go on a moon-landing mission. This is, however, set to change with this next spacewalk. According to schedule, the space agency plans to have the next man and its first woman on the moon by 2024. The proposed mission is the Artemis moon mission. NASA hopes to have this mission serve as an inspiration to people around the world. 

According to Koch, the mission will help show women can also contribute to the space exploration program. Space travel has been viewed as a male-dominated industry, with only 14 women sent to space in over 200 launches. However, over the last few years, the number of female astronauts signing up for space missions has grown considerably large with the number being half in Koch’s 2013 class.  

The decision on who goes for spacewalk mission has been based on which available astronauts are capable of handling the pertain able tasks. His is because spacewalk missions constitute a significant challenge and astronauts confess they do take a physical toll. 

 A previous mission that had two women, Christina Koch and Anne McClain, was stopped due to alleged misfitting sizes of their spacesuits. This raised a lot of concern with the public questioning if the reasons behind the changes were true. Astronaut Anne McClain decided to swap out with Nick Hague taking her place so that they would wear suits that best fit them.  

With the newly planned spacewalk coming, astronauts sent to space will be expected to swap a battery unit that did not activate upon installation on the previous space mission. This is important to provide the station with more power. 

The spacewalk will be featured live from 6:30 am on NASA Television, NASA’s website, and the NASA YouTube channel. The International Space Station blog will also be updated frequently with events following the launch 

With such prospects in place, the space agency expects more women to be involved in space missions. This will be through the influence that agency women Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, and Mary Jackson played in the building of the Langley Research Centre.

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